Great War 100 Reads

Commemorating the centenary of the First World War in books

Monday Monuments and Memorials – Broad Brothers, Central United Church, Calgary

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A memorial service at Central Methodist Church on 1 July 1923 honoured three brothers killed in WW1. William, Thomas and Percy were sons of William Tucker Broad and Caroline G. Broad. The plaque remains in the sanctuary of what is now Central United Church.

All three are buried in France.

William was a lawyer in the firm of McLean, Patterson and Broad. He is in Ecoivres Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais.

Thomas, a cashier, is in Monchy British Cemetery, Pas de Calais.

Percy was a student-at-law at the firm of Lougheed, Bennett and McLaws before he enlisted. He is in Courcelette British Cemetery, Somme.

The brothers are remembered on several other plaques, including:

  • The Birkenhead Institute in England, where they attended school before the family moved to Canada
  • The University of Calgary Law School (William and Percy)
  • The Law Society of Alberta in Edmonton (William and Percy)
  • The general memorial at Central United Church

Many thanks to the welcoming congregants at Central United.

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Author: greatwar100reads

Canadian crusader for equality and justice. Connoisseur and creator of the written word. Commemorating the centenary of the First World War in books and monuments. Read more at greatwar100reads.wordpress.com.

3 thoughts on “Monday Monuments and Memorials – Broad Brothers, Central United Church, Calgary

  1. It seems that it was many years after the war before plaques were erected. In this case, 1923. Is there any explanation of the delay between the end of the war in 1918 and these expressions of remembrance? Did people, at first, feel their grief so profoundly that they could not think of things like plaques and statues? Was commemoration encouraged by the government or Church in the 1920s and we are seeing the results of that?

  2. Pingback: Remembrance Whensoever | Great War 100 Reads

  3. Good question, Vicki. So good, it inspired a whole post. See Remembrance Whensoever.

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