Great War 100 Reads

Commemorating the centenary of the First World War in books


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Monday Monuments and Memorials – Nursing Sister Edith May Allison, Deseronto, ON

Each nurse tells a story.

Edith May Allison was born in Marysville, Ontario on May 14, 1881, the daughter of Sarah Edith Prentice Allison (spelled Prentiss in some records) and Jonathan Greeley Allison. She had four sisters, Olive, Pearl, Helena (Lena) and Florence (Flossie). 

Edith and Florence both became nurses. Around 1912, the family moved to Calgary. Olive may not have moved with them. In city directories (not always an up-to-date source) Pearl is listed as a teacher, Lena as a stenographer; both seem to have moved from the family home before the war. Their father died in 1915, their mother in 1937. Continue reading


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Monday Monuments and Memorials – Memorial Window, McGill University, Montreal

A stained glass window in the Redpath Library at McGill University is “in memory of 23 members of the McGill chapter of Delta Upsilon who gave their lives in the Great War.” Continue reading


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Monday Monuments and Memorials – Beatrice Lennie Sculptures, Shaughnessy Hospital, Vancouver

Two friezes by British Columbia sculptor Beatrice Lennie flank the main entrance of the former Shaughnessy Military Hospital, at 4500 Oak Street in Vancouver.

The carved stone panels are about five by eight feet. The left panel shows a nurse helping an injured soldier, with the crest of the Canadian Medical Corps at the bottom. The right panel shows a doctor holding a wounded soldier, over the Latin phrase “on sibi sed omnibus” – not for oneself but for all. The upper corner ornamentation, sunbeams and clouds suit the streamlined art moderne style of the 1940s building. Lennie signed each panel on the bottom right corner. Continue reading


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Monday Monuments and Memorials – Margaret Macdonald, Bailey’s Brook, NS

Major Margaret C. Macdonald was appointed Matron-in-Chief of the Canadian Nursing Service in April 1914, making her the first woman with the rank of major in the British Empire. She was responsible for over 1900 Canadian nurses serving overseas during WW1. She returned to Canada in 1919 to help reorganize the Canadian Army Medical Corps. In 1926, she unveiled the Nursing Sisters Memorial* on Parliament Hill. Continue reading


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An Interview with “Those Splendid Girls” author, Katherine Dewar

I am pleased to welcome a special guest to Great War 100 Reads today. Katherine Dewar, author of Those Splendid Girls: The Heroic Service of Prince Edward Island Nurses in the Great War, has kindly agreed to share some thoughts about her work.

What was the biggest challenge in researching Those Splendid Girls?

Katherine Dewar: Researching is so much fun. Like a good mystery, the challenges are there to be solved. I spent about three years researching. Most mornings I could hardly wait to get started to see what piece of the puzzle I might unearth that day. I was blessed in several ways. Living on a small island where many family roots go back to the first settlement, and having done genealogy, I was aware that certain surnames were associated with particular communities. I would check the phone book in the community where a nurse might be from and call someone with the same surname. If I had a wrong person they usually knew who the right one might be. In one case I was looking for a picture; the lady on the phone was hesitant to give me information until she established my genealogical roots. After a brief conversation she realized that my father grew up a few miles from her; as a nurse, she knew my uncle who was a doctor; and her husband had worked with my cousin. The information was then forthcoming. She gave me the phone number of a lady in Boston who had a picture. The lady in Boston was delighted that someone on Prince Edward Island (PEI) was doing research on her relative. She emailed me information and a picture within the hour. Thus are the benefits of doing research on PEI. Continue reading


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Monday Monuments and Memorials – Rena McLean Veterans Garden, Charlottetown, PEI

My travels have not taken me to Prince Edward Island since starting this project, so I was pleased to accept Katherine Dewar’s offer of some of her photos of the Rena McLean Veterans Garden in Charlottetown.

Rena McLean is one of the nursing sisters featured in Katherine’s book, Those Splendid Girls. She joined the Canadian Army Medical Corps in 1914 and served with distinction in several venues. She was assigned to the hospital ship Llandovery Castle in March 1918. The ship was torpedoed on 27 June and 234 doctors, nurses and patients perished. Continue reading


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Those Splendid Girls: The Heroic Service of Prince Edward Island Nurses in the Great War

Prince Edward Island, Canada’s smallest province, sent over 3000 sons to war from 1914 to 1918. In 1919, PEI newspapers feted their homecomings on the front page, documenting their exploits and their decorations. Heroes all, they were welcomed by local dignitaries, bands and throngs of cheering people. They were paraded through the streets of Charlottetown.

In contrast, 115 PEI daughters served as nurses in the war. If their homecoming was noted, it was on p 8 of the newspaper, in the column “Of Local Interest.” No fanfare greeted their return. 

Katherine Dewar, a PEI nurse and author, noticed this disparity 100 years later. She finally tells the nurses’ stories in Those Splendid Girls: The Heroic Service of Prince Edward Island Nurses in the Great War.

Dewar’s extensive research shows generally how Canadian nursing transpired during the war (in the Nightingale tradition), how politics and who-you-knew played a role, and how PEI women fit into the scene both collectively and individually. Not only did she search newspapers and archives, Dewar sought out descendants of the nurses to uncover diaries, photos and other memorabilia. (Perhaps an easier task for a native on PEI than it would be elsewhere, given the comparative homogeneity of the Island’s population and an insider’s knowledge of family origins.) All of these are woven together to bring the women to life.

How could these women be thought of as anything but heroic?

A nursing veteran of the Boer War, Georgina Pope was in charge of training new nursing recruits for duty overseas at the beginning of WW1. Although Pope had seniority, politics and patronage gave the nod to Margaret Macdonald as Matron-in-chief of in the Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC) in 1914. Nonetheless, Pope applied for a field posting. It came to her in December 1917, when she was posted as Matron at No 2 Canadian Stationary Hospital in France. The official accounts of the Pope’s service (her own war diary and military records) are a stark contrast to Dewar’s documentation of the conditions that lead to her discharge in March 1919, clearly suffering from shell shock but not diagnosed as such. “The army managed to skirt the issue of her nervous debility by ignoring it altogether.” (p 95)

Rena McLean was one of the 100 nurses selected to go to England with the first contingent of the CEF in 1914. After a whirlwind furlough in London, she was among the 35 nurses sent to France in November 1914 to establish No 2 Canadian Stationary Hospital … the first Canadians in France in WW1. In 1916, she was posted to Salonika, working under arduous conditions. By summer 1917, the Canadian nurses in Salonika were recalled to England, where McLean was posted to No 16 Canadian General Hospital at Orpington. By 1918, she was transferred to transport, sailing on medical ships across the Atlantic. Her parents visited her in Halifax in June 1918, promising them it would be her last trip. Indeed it was … her ship the Llandovery Castle was torpedoed on 27 June, and 234 doctors, nurses and patients perished. The Soldiers’ Convalescent Hospital in PEI was renamed the Rena McLean Memorial Hospital.

Beatrice MacDonald was the first serious US army casualty in WW1. She was also the most decorated nurse in WW1 serving in any army nursing corps. She received the Distinguished Service Cross, the Distinguished Service Medal and the Purple Heart from the US, the British Military Meal and Associate of the Royal Red Cross, and the French Croix de guerre.

As long as nursing sisters were seen as being in a non-heroic service role that was not a threat to the soldier warriors, all was well. But as soon as they attempted to step out of that role, gender discrimination raised its ugly head. … The three most obvious discriminatory practices that affected women in the CAMC during WW1 were lack of command, failure to accept female doctors in the CAMC, and refusal of the British authorities to issue the Military Cross to Canadian nursing sisters. (p 157)

Possibly a part of the great silence came from the nurses themselves. … They saw no glory in war – nothing heroic. … At the end of the war, they packed away their diaries, their photo albums, and other memorabilia and buried their memories. (p 166)

Dewar includes an extensive appendix with biographies of all 115 PEI women who served in WW1, be it in CAMC, British or American units, the Red Cross, or as VADs. We learn of their exploits and their decorations. As was their due … long overdue.


You can check out the website of Those Splendid Girls for photos, sample chapters and more.

Read my interview with author Katherine Dewar.


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Monday Monuments and Memorials – Georgina Pope, Valiants Memorial, Ottawa

Georgina Pope (1862-1938) was the first Matron in the Canadian Army Medical Corps, a position she attained in 1908. She served as a military nurse in the Second Boer War, which earned her the Royal Red Cross Medal for meritorious and distinguished service in 1903. She was the first Canadian to receive this honour. Her WW1 service was in Canadian hospitals in France and the UK. She was 55 years old when she went overseas in 1917.

This bust is part of the Valiants Memorial on Confederation Square near the National War Memorial.

The Valiants Memorial is a collection of nine busts and five statues of individuals who played key roles in military conflicts throughout Canadian history. The memorial was dedicated in 2006.

The focus on individuals is a sharp contrast from the other elements of remembrance on Confederation Square: The National War Memorial and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier honour collective action and loss. I’m inclined to think the Valiants detract from that. That said, the individual statues sometimes become the conduit of other messages. Montreal Canadiens fans once dressed them in Habs jerseys during an NHL playoff series against the Ottawa Senators. And on a biting cold day in January 2014, an anonymous knitter wrapped them in warm scarves free for the taking by those in need.